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Galley Hill Primary School, Hemel Hempstead. Galley Hill rated GOOD by Ofsted. 'Value of the Month - 'COURAGE'' OUT OF HOURS POSITIVE COVID TEST REPORTING: Email admin@galleyhill.herts.sch.uk

Homework

Introduction

 

Homework is a valuable element of the teaching and learning process, and children are encouraged to work at home on a regular basis. Regular homework is important as it gives pupils the opportunity to practise at home, reinforcing tasks done in class, and further develop specific skills. It also helps pupils to become confident and independent learners. It must be remembered, however, that children have worked very hard at their lessons and many of them, particularly the younger ones, will be tired at the end of the school day. Expecting them to tackle large amounts of homework in the evening would not be appropriate. Homework will be given in moderation and parents must acknowledge that the many excellent out-of-school sporting, musical, social and recreational activities that children are involved with these days are a very important part of their whole learning experience. Similarly, spending quality time with parents, sharing all manner of activities, is essential for children. Homework should not be viewed as a substitute for this.

 

Definitions

 

Homework is work which is set to be completed outside the normal working day and timetabled curriculum. Homework is usually related directly to work being studied in school. It is a period of independent study which might, where appropriate, involve parental support or input.

 

Objectives

 

The objective of this policy is to outline clearly the purpose of homework at Galley Hill, the way it is organised and the expectations of pupils, staff and parents.

 

Purpose of homework

 

The purpose of homework is to:

 

  • extend school learning, thus playing an important part in raising standards;
  • consolidate and reinforce basic skills and understanding;
  • develop independent-learning skills;
  • develop self-discipline and personal organisation;
  • develop home-school partnerships.

 

General principles

 

The amount and type of homework set will vary according to the age of the child. Teachers usually establish a routine and pattern of setting and collecting homework, as well as giving feedback to the children about their completed work. Advice is also available on the school website to support parents in helping their children with reading and mathematics.

 

Our aim is that homework should be:

 

  • structured, with the purpose explained clearly to the pupils;
  • appropriate for all pupils, including those with any special needs;
  • given consistently across the school.

 

In addition, homework will be:

 

  • varied from subject to subject, and varied within each subject;
  • manageable within a reasonable timeframe;
  • challenging and purposeful;
  • recognised and valued by teachers and parents;
  • recognised as being important by the pupil;
  • excluded as a punishment; however, if parents agree, pupils may be set work to complete at home if they have wasted time in class.

 

The support of parents/carers is seen as essential; it is hoped that parents will support their children at home, through monitoring and providing encouragement.

 

Types of homework

 

The aim is to establish the foundation of good practice, with regard to homework, developing it progressively across the key stages. Homework will increase in variety and amount as the children move through the school.

 

Taking responsibility

 

Being responsible for looking after books and materials which are taken home, and also for ensuring the return of articles to school, is an important part of the homework process.

 

How can parents help?

 

It is hoped that parents will give their active support to our Homework Policy. Children who receive regular support and encouragement from home make the best progress at school. The setting of homework allows parents to have direct involvement in their child’s learning. Parents are welcome to discuss homework issues informally with teachers or at parents’ evenings.

 

Parents can help their children in many ways, but particularly by:

 

  • listening to them read or by reading to them, every day if possible;
  • checking to see if they have homework to do;
  • encouraging them to work in a comfortable and quiet area of the house;
  • asking to look at the finished work and by being positive in their praise;
  • acknowledging the effort that their children have made by initialling a reading record;
  • helping if children get stuck, but not actually doing the work for them. This is important in mathematics as some of the methods and techniques used by pupils may be different from those used by parents.

 

If it is clear that pupils are experiencing difficulty with the work a short note to the teacher would help to draw attention to the problem.

 

Children with special needs

 

Homework set is differentiated to reflect the different ability levels within the class; this may be through the setting of different activities or differing expectations of outcome. From time to time, pupils with special needs may be set different homework, in order to reinforce a particular skill or area of learning.

 

General whole-school expectations

 

The school has the following expectations:

 

Teachers will:

 

  • ensure that homework is an integral part of the curriculum and is planned and prepared alongside all other programmes of learning;
  • provide parents with a homework schedule at the start of the school year;
  • ensure that homework is marked in a timely manner.

 

Pupils will:

 

  • at an appropriate age, record homework tasks, demonstrate a commitment to spending an allocated time doing the tasks set and hand the work back on time;
  • complete their homework to the best of their ability.

 

Parents will:

 

  • support their child’s learning by helping their children at home, monitoring homework and providing encouragement and guidance;
  • provide feedback on the homework by writing in their child’s reading record;
  • inform the class teacher if an issue arises.

 

Consequences of not completing homework

 

Children need to know that what they do has consequences. At secondary school, if a pupil does not complete their homework, they risk falling behind. They may also hold up others – clearly it is harder for the teacher to keep the whole class moving forward if some are doing the homework and others are not. At primary school, too, we all want our children to develop their knowledge – but we also want them to develop values. Homework set at primary school is likely to be of relatively shorter duration, but if a child is asked to do it and they do not, for that to have no consequence would not be a positive lesson. Unless there is a reasonable excuse, pupils in KS2 who do not complete homework can expect to remain in class during playtime the following Thursday in order to finish it as a consequence.

 

Specific year-group expectations

 

Nursery & Reception

 

Pupils are expected to share a book/read with an adult every day, having this noted in their reading records.

 

Year 1

 

Pupils are expected to share a book/read with an adult at least 3 times a week, having this noted in their reading records, and complete a spelling activity, which is provided on the school website. Homework is issued on Friday and should be returned the following Thursday. Every child has access to Numbots.

 

Year 2

 

Pupils are expected to share a book/read with an adult at least 3 times a week, having this noted in their reading records; complete a spelling activity, which is provided on the school website, and maths, usually related to multiplication tables (2s, 5s and 10s). Homework is issued on Friday and should be returned the following Thursday. Every child has access to Times Tables Rock Stars

 

Year 3

 

Pupils are expected to share a book/read with an adult at least 3 times a week, having this noted in their reading records; complete a vocabulary-building activity, based on words provided online, and maths, usually related to multiplication tables (3s, 4s and 8s) and accessed via either Times Tables Rock Stars or a worksheet. Homework is issued on Friday and should be returned the following Wednesday.

 

Year 4

 

Pupils are expected to share a book/read with an adult at least 3 times a week, having this noted in their reading records; complete a vocabulary-building activity, based on words provided online, and maths, usually related to multiplication tables (6s, 7s, 9s, 11s and 12s) and accessed via either Times Tables Rock Stars or a worksheet. Homework is issued on Friday and should be returned the following Wednesday.

 

 

Year 5 & Year 6

 

Pupils are expected to share a book/read with an adult at least 3 times a week, having this noted in their reading records; complete a vocabulary-building activity, based on words provided online, and maths, usually related to multiplication tables and accessed via either Times Tables Rock Stars or a worksheet. Homework is issued on Friday and should be returned the following Wednesday.

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